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U.S. Trade and Energy Policy: Coherence or Conflict?

Sponsored by WITA

Wednesday 12-Dec-12 8:30 AM to 11:00 AM EST

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Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center

1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Horizon Ballroom - Ground Floor
Washington DC 20004 US
Google Maps | Hotels Near | Yahoo! Maps | Weather Forecast

Speaker 2 panels! See complete speaker details below.

Event Description

Breaking news! 

The natural gas revolution reversing LNG tanker trade, Dec. 9


 
DOE issues long-awaited report on Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) exports, Dec. 6
 
 
U.S. Trade and Energy Policy: Coherence or Conflict?
 
Overview:
For more than 60 years, the goal of U.S. trade policy has been to create a more open global market by reducing or eliminating tariffs, trade-distorting subsidies, and discriminatory regulations.  By contrast, since at least the early 1970s, the goal of US energy policy has been to achieve “independence” from global markets by boosting domestic production, restricting exports, and reducing imports of fossil energy.  In more recent years, as the United States has committed to increase its use of renewable energy, it has adopted tax preferences, direct investments, and government procurement restrictions to encourage the domestic manufacturing of renewable energy technology and equipment.
Is there a contradiction between a U.S. trade policy that promotes a global market and a U.S. energy policy focused on self-sufficiency?  Or is energy “different” from other goods in way that justifies its exclusion from conventional trade rules?  And if so, what are the costs and benefits to the U.S. economy of doing so?
 
Panel 1 –  U.S. Energy Exports (8:30 – 9:40 a.m.):
The significant growth over the last five years of commercial large-scale shale gas and shale oil production in the United States has transformed the domestic energy market.  It has dramatically expanded U.S. energy production and lowered energy costs for U.S. manufacturers.  The shale energy boom has also created new and unforeseen opportunities to increase U.S. exports.
Our first panel will address current U.S. policy regarding energy exports, including restrictions on liquefied natural gas and crude oil exports.  They will discuss the effects of those policies on: (i) U.S. energy producers and manufacturers; (ii) the U.S. trade balance; (iii) U.S. foreign policy and security interests; (iv) the use of export restraints by U.S. trading partners on industrial raw materials, including rare earth minerals, and food.
 
Featuring:
Sarah Ladislaw, Co-Director, Energy and National Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies;
Paul Cicio, President, Industrial Energy Consumers of America; and
Lisa E. Epifani, Partner, Van Ness Feldman.
 
Moderator:  Michael Smart, Vice President, Rock Creek Global Advisors.
 
Panel 2 -  Renewable Energy (9:50 – 11:00 a.m):
U.S. renewable energy policy has two principal objectives: (i) the rapid deployment of cost-effective renewable energy in the United States and globally to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and (ii) the development and expansion of a U.S. manufacturing base for such clean energy technologies to create jobs, increase innovation, and enhance U.S. competitiveness.  Our second panel will address the trade policy tension between these goals.  For instance, a liberalized trade regime facilitates the establishment of efficient global supply chains; however, such supply chains may not include U.S. manufacturing of renewable energy technologies.
 
The panel will also discuss: (i) international efforts to reduce or eliminate trade barriers affecting environmental goods and services; (ii) the use of trade remedies against renewable energy technologies; (iii) the merits of different types of government support for renewable energy (e.g., R&D, direct subsidies, local content requirements, and government procurement restrictions); and (iv) the spate of WTO cases arising from government support programs and the effect of those cases on the development of renewable energy.
 
Featuring:
            Josh Meltzer, Fellow in Global Economy and Development, Brookings Institution
            Elizabeth Drake, Partner, Stewart & Stewart
            David Nelson, Senior Manager, Global Government Affairs and Policy-Americas, GE
           
Moderator:  Michael Smart, Vice President, Rock Creek Global Advisors.
 
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Comments

We are sorry, but no free passes may be used for this two-panel event.
 
Event held with generous support of the Ronald Reagan Building's Office for Trade Promotion.
 
WITA has a 48 hour cancellation policy.  Any cancellations within 48 hours of the event are billed to cover costs.
 
Reagan Building requires photo ID and passage through security.  All bags, electronics and metals must go through Xray machine, so please allow for extra time when planning your visit.
 

 Event Contact

 Event Coordinator

Javiera Gallardo James Wilkinson
   

U.S. Trade and Energy Policy: Coherence or Conflict?

Sponsored by WITA

Wednesday 12-Dec-12 8:30 AM to 11:00 AM EST

Speaker 2 panels! See complete speaker details below.

U.S. Trade and Energy Policy: Coherence or Conflict?

Sponsored by WITA

Wednesday 12-Dec-12 8:30 AM to 11:00 AM EST

Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center

1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Horizon Ballroom - Ground Floor
Washington DC 20004 US
Google Maps | Hotels Near | Yahoo! Maps | Weather Forecast

U.S. Trade and Energy Policy: Coherence or Conflict?

Sponsored by WITA

Wednesday 12-Dec-12 8:30 AM to 11:00 AM EST

 
Before
12-Dec-12 5:00 AM
Member:
$50.00
Non-Member:
$80.00
Student Member:
$30.00
Government Member:
$30.00

 


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